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ILOA demonstriert Mondgerät vom Gipfel des Mauna Kea, Hawaii

WAIMEA, Hawai’i – The International Lunar Observatory Association (ILOA), led by American businessman / educator Steve Durst, plans to place an astronomical observatory on the Moon by 2014 that will c

WAIMEA, Hawai’i – The International Lunar Observatory Association (ILOA), led by American businessman / educator Steve Durst, plans to place an astronomical observatory on the Moon by 2014 that will capture never before seen images of the Galaxy, Stars, Moon and Earth.

On December 18th-20th, a Global Demonstration of the International Lunar Observatory precursor instrument (the ‘ILO-X’) took place on the Summit of Mauna Kea, hosted by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), when science teams from around the world accessed the instrument over the internet and operated it as if it were on the Moon. Astronomers from the USA mainland, Hawaii, China, India, Canada, Japan, Europe and Africa are part of this historic demonstration of international collaboration in space exploration enabled through the commercial space sector.

The ILO-X is expanding the model of commercial space investment to the Moon to do science, education, exploration and commercial activities – such as Lunar Broadcasting of Space Calendar through affiliated Space Age Publishing Company. “The primary goal of the International Lunar Observatory is to expand human understanding of the Galaxy and Cosmos through observation from our Moon,” said ILOA founder and director, Steve Durst. “We are extremely encouraged by our Global Demonstration and are excited about sending the ILO-X to the Moon.”

Google Lunar X PRIZE contender, Moon Express, has designed and is building the International Lunar Observatory precursor (ILO-X) as the first astronomical telescope that will operate on the Moon, looking out at the Galaxy and heavens beyond and back at the Earth. About the size of a shoe-box, the ILO-X is using leading edge optical and imaging technology to deliver dramatic inspiring deep sky pictures of objects inside and outside our Milky Way Galaxy.

“The ILO will allow researchers, educators and students from around the world to access astronomical images from the surface of the Moon,” said Bob Richards, co-founder and CEO of Moon Express. “It’s inspirational science at its best.”